Friday Fictioneers: Batteries

I’ve tried something different this week, ten stories under one hundred words, some of them straining to reach story status, but still!

Photo Prompt © Sean Fallon

Ten Batteries

 

1. The vibrator was dead. He turned the bottom of it waiting for that kick of electric chugging in his hand. Nothing. It’s as annoying as running out of condoms in its way. He tried the remote control batteries, they were the wrong sort. Tutting, he turned back to the bedroom door to break the bad news.

 

*

 

2.  I will make it fresh for you, the man behind the counter assured me. We were staring dubiously at the row of frankfurters; they looked slightly soiled, as if they’d been rolled in dirt then refried. Thank you, I said. We waited ten minutes, and it appeared, crisp batter soaked in vinegar and salt. The greased up object steamed in the cold night as I bit into it. The tramp near the cash point asked for change, and I said sorry, speaking through the mouthfuls.

 

*

 

3. A wind battered house stood at the bottom of the hill. The massive sulking presence of land loomed behind it, and a huge footprint nestled between snow and tree trunk. It was the route she used to walk the dog, and she stepped within a few inches of the print. It was a heavy stamped foot, claws ripping up the ground slightly at each point. She whistled the dog to her, and they went inside the house, together. She will hear a whining later, not the wind.

 

*

 

4. He’d been typing all night trying to get the wording of the email right. I don’t want to be with you, but you’re still important. He’d finally got it, he thought. It was emphatic, genuine, even touched with old romance in certain paragraphs. With an alarmingly high pitched squeak the screen flashed up: 1% battery life left, and then went black. The next message he wrote would be one sentence long.

 

*

 

5. He buried batteries as a child expecting them to grow. He imagined the small trees with the flashing leaves, silver and green with strands of red running through. He would dig a small hole with a fork, and then pat the small heavy metal into the soil. His dad would spend hours wondering where they all went; little did he know soon he’d have an energy tree, boughs creaking with the solid fruit.

 

*

 

6. That’s as big as a battering ram, she said, eyeing it up and down. Well, it’s a tenner to you and no one else. She deliberates. Alright then, I’ll take it.

 

*

 

7. The car’s battery had been overloaded this winter. She’d had the heating on every day on the school trip, the windscreen wipers shoving frost around her smeared screen every morning. And now it had given up the ghost. She stood shivering on the road waiting for the AA, a chill wind’s icy hands caressing her.

 

*

 

8. As his phone slipped from his pocket into the ocean’s calm waters, he saw its battery life plummet for the last time to one bar. He scrabbled for it in the clear tide, but it shifted between sand and rock and when he did retrieve it, its screen was tight as a clam, not giving up any of the trove it had carried.

 

*

 

9. Do you need recharging? Is your enthusiasm for life at its lowest ebb? Have you been wiped out by stress? Come to Butlers!

 

*

 

10. The rocking chair creaked as she leant into the floor, and then pushed back again. Like a wound up toy whose machinations were slowing down, the battered piece of life she clutched to herself was worn and thin. She was warm beneath her layers, and as this thinnest layer lifted itself from her, her breathing released.

 

*

 

If there’s a favourite one I’ll expand it into a bigger story, so do mention which one you like!

 

 

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19 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers: Batteries

    • Thank you Anne, I really wanted twenty because I could count twenty batteries in the jar. But I figured ten would do! cheers for the vote 😀

  1. Fun takes on the prompt, Becca and intriguing that you actually counted the batteries in the jar LOL. Personally #5 was my favorite. Leave it to a child to plant a battery and expect a lit tree.

  2. My favorite is #5. Clever idea to count the batteries but, tell me, how did you manage to find time to write so many? And you say you wanted to write twenty? It boggles my mind. Well done.

    • I just get determined once I’ve got an idea in my head haha. It took an hour, then I was like that is plenty methinks. Thanks for the vote! x

  3. Pingback: Friday Fictioneers: Follow up | beccaaudra

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